Tuesday, September 9, 2008

The "I Love America" Post

Whenever I discuss issues that show America in a bad light (like in my last post), I always have this urge to censor myself. Lately in America, it’s been very difficult to critique the status quo without being branded anti-American or “unpatriotic” (I’ve always had a problem with that word). Add in being an Arab-American who is very visibly Muslim into the mix, and you suddenly have national security risk potential.

I love being American, but I hate having to reassure people of that fact. Believe me, I’ve had my fair share of Thanksgivings, Halloweens and Fourth of Julys. For me, an In-N-Out Burger is the best comfort food and Disneyland is the happiest place on Earth.

But love doesn’t replace justice and truth. Those are separate things. Just because I love America doesn’t mean I’m going to let its (often gigantic) mistakes slide. (Iraq, anyone?) If anything, loving America makes me hold it to a higher standard than someone who doesn’t care much for the country might.

I believe strongly in the ideals America was founded on. But, like most of my fellow countrymen (and women), these last eight years have made me very, very frustrated.

I know I keep tooting the Obama horn. But change, change, change. We need it. The whole world needs it. And it can’t come soon enough.

4 comments:

Anna Ray! said...

"If anything, loving America makes me hold it to a higher standard than someone who doesn’t care much for the country might."
Nour, you are...just right on with that. I love your insights and hope to wax philosophical this December. And above all, I hope to have an OBAMA VICTORY PARTY. I'm praying hard and spreading the good word. Keep writing. You rock.

TEK2022 said...

"If anything, loving America makes me hold it to a higher standard than someone who doesn’t care much for the country might."

ok, i just wrote a reeeeeally long comment but deleted it all because it came out extremely rude and cynical. so ill just say this... i am no fan of American policies... it will take a lot more to impress me than it ever will to impress someone who loves the country to begin with. doesn't that make MY standards higher?


P.S. i know this is a stupid and argumentative comment, but its better than what i wrote before.
:P

Nicholas Karavatos said...

I believe Nour made a clear distinction between the policies of various administrations (it doesn't matter if you agree with them or not) and the guiding ideals of the nation - which since 1789 almost every revolution in the world has at least pretended to replicate.

I think Nour's point is evident in the disenfranchised groups that have struggled through the centuries, using the bonded ideals of the society, to build better lives for themselves and their progeny because they still felt, despite deprivation and hardship, that the socio-political structure and cultural dynamism of the federation were their best options for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

There has always been the tension between the patrotism-is-obedience crowd (which is how most societies define/practise it) and the dissent-as-patriotism crowd.

I recommend going to the AUS library and watching the DVDs *The Weather Underground* and *Berkeley in the Sixties*.

For contrast (now don't get offended) in which Arab or Muslim or Middle Eastern country (however you wish to categorize them) would a minority (racial or ethnic or linguistic or religious) ever be elected Head of State?

Barack is Beautiful.

Anonymous said...

[url=http://luckypuppy.bravehost.com/FORUM/profile.php?mode=viewprofile&u=505&sid=78274a13148eb2701a3d9c84bef1a377]Useful[/url]. That story was really inspiring. As an aspiring game programmer, this was really the motivation I needed.[url=http://www.xfire.com/blog/estebanuqa/4404654/].[/url]